Sexuality and Disability

My Story

Being In A Wheelchair

'I was very nervous and didn't have the usual teenage experience of growing up and being aware of myself as a sexual person. All the emphasis on "the perfect body" doesn't help, especially since there's no way I could ever aspire to what is seen as ideal. Being in a wheelchair limits my ability to move in what you would consider the standard sexual ways. It can be hard enough discussing sex with an established partner, never mind having to be upfront from the start and really spell out the realities - for example, telling someone it hurts when he does that, I have no feeling there or I physically cannot manage to do that.

I Have To Keep Trying

'I continued my job at the clinic doing in-home therapy with children. During a staff meeting, a family new to the clinic was discussed. They had waited 6 months to get a spot in with our therapists and psychiatrist. They had a little girl, about 3 years old, whom they had adopted from Ukraine. They were desperate for help, and actively seeking a new family for her. I shared an office with her therapist and she told me of the extreme withdrawal, refusal to speak and overwhelming sadness in the little girl. I approached my husband right away about the possibilities. He needed to think. A lot. For a long time. Which was smart, but I am not all that patient a person.

Questions

Question1 I'm 13 years old, and I'm not sure what's happening to my body.
As you enter your teenage years your body will go through many changes. Read more on I'm 13 years old, and I'm not sure what's happening to my body.

Question2 How important is sex in a relationship?
Says counsellor Deepak Kashyap, 'Sex is very important in a romantic relationship. Because even though every label is open-ended, every label has some meaning to it, Read more on How important is sex in a relationship?

Question3 My family never takes me out anywhere with them, and if someone comes home they lock me up in my room. I feel terrible. What do I do?
You are not alone. Many women with disabilities face this from their natal and affinal (in laws) families. Read more on My family never takes me out anywhere with them, and if someone comes home they lock me up in my room. I feel terrible. What do I do?